redefining what it means to read – the seven stages of librarianship

Enjoying listening to Jenny Levine talking about gaming in libraries. I’m still not much of a gamer, but I’ve definitely been seeing the value of gaming programs bringing teens into libraries. She pointed me to a document that I hadn’t read and am really enjoying [kill me, I'm multiasking!] called Fiat Lux, Fiat Late­bra: A Cel­e­bra­tion of His­tor­i­cal Library Func­tions [pdf] by D. W. Krum­mel. Not a new article (Jenny posted about it in 2008) but a great read including, especially “The Seven Ages of Librar­i­an­ship” which is a great exposition of how the library has evolved and is evolving.

Florida Library History, circa 1998

I am going to Florida on Sunday, so I have Florida on my mind. I found out about the Florida Library History Project and was pleased to know the entire thing is available online as a big PDF. Some enterprising student could, with the permission of Kathleen de la Pena McCook get it online crosslinked and searchable.

The Florida Library History Project (FLHP) began in January 1998. Letters requesting histories were sent to all public libraries in Florida with follow-up letters sent after an initial response was received from the libraries. E-mail messages were sent out to FL-LIB listservs encouraging participation in the project. A poster session was presented by USF research assistant Catherine Jasper at the 1998 Florida Library Association (FLA) Annual Conference, an event that marked FLA’s 75th anniversary. At the end of this funding period, 89 library systems and organizations had provided histories. These have been compiled and are reproduced in this volume as submitted by participating libraries. Highlights include library founding, collections, services, budgets and expenditures, personnel, funding, survey results, technology, and developments.

[via]

Why is my Dad talking to me about the public library?

My Dad never goes to the public library. He buys his own books and is a little… fussy about public spaces. That said, when I go to visit him we talk about library issues because they’re interesting to me and he’s a techie and always curious how libraries seem to have gotten so much so wrong. He did talk to me about two library news items that I found interesting. One was the I Love My Librarian award winners which my Dad read about in the New York Times. The other was the Chelmsford High School Library’s Learning Commons project — which he read about in the Boston Globe — which provided an (incorrect) opening to say “Hey, my friend Brian is a librarian there! He has a blog!” I then got to prattle on about their town-wide history project which I’ve been meaning to blog about for a while. So, there it is, get your library in the paper get the retiree crowd curious about you.

podcast suggest: Unquiet History

For those of you who thrilled to Matthew Battles’ book Library: An Unquiet History should try out his podcast — similarly titled but not library-specific — Unquiet History. I’m currently enjoying listening to a short history of medeival urban garbage. Fun!

eulogy for the “university of the ghetto”

A poignant tale of a library becoming an Idea Store.

On the record the staff talk brightly of the new Idea Store which will replace both the Whitechapel and Stepney libraries from mid-September – the glossy leaflet boasts not only “more books, CDs and DVDs” and seven-day-a-week opening, but also that it “is located right in front of Sainsbury’s”.

Off the record they feel bereaved, despite struggling once its fate was sealed and maintenance virtually stopped: in a recent flood the usual buckets were clearly failing to cope.

[thanks ej]