Brown’s proposed CA budget eliminates library funding

Californa Governor’s proposed budget includes eliminating state funding for libraries. Now, library funding is a complex thing so this is a different sort of animal than saying “Let’s close all the libraries!” but it’s still not only a blow for CA’s libraries but could also endanger other federal funding which is predicated on matching what the state already offers. The California Library Association has posted a response to Brown on their website.

4 Responses to “Brown’s proposed CA budget eliminates library funding”

  1. Jeff Scott Says:

    It’s complicated how the state funds local libraries. Libraries get money for sharing materials with each other (known as Transaction Based Reimbursements). As a California resident, I can go into any library, get a card, and check out materials. It’s a great system. It is also a big funding source for those who can take advantage of it, especially a consortium. Brown essentially destroys that funding. The response from the Governor is that libraries should be funded locally. Furthermore, with a 66% approval required for any new taxes, it’s difficult to raise any additional funding beyond property tax. There is a good post here regarding the situation http://pvlddirectorsblog.typepad.com/kathy/2011/01/the-governors-budget-proposal-what-it-means-for-california-libraries.html but the cuts mean different things to different libraries. (Which makes it tough to advocate against the cuts other than, this will reduce services.)

  2. John Says:

    Funny how these politicians never decide that the legislature should have all its funding cut….

  3. nonreflectiveobject Says:

    If we take the proposed budget cut of $30M and divide by the population of California (Googled at 36,961,664), we come up with $0.81 per resident. Let’s figure that half of residents pay taxes, so that comes to $1.63 per taxpayer. About the same as a medium coffee from Starbucks. Disheartening, to say the least.

  4. Craig Says:

    Funding libraries and schools locally may sound like a reasonable idea on the face of it, but it results in the age-old problem of having the best resources and services in the richest communities, and the fewest and worst libraries or schools in the poorest communities where they’re needed most.