2005 reading list, a year end summary

Time for the annual recitation of the books, same as last year, 600+ posts later. Thanks to some handy last-minute coding by Greg, it’s much easier for me to make a list of all the books I read in 2005. Yes I love LibraryThing, no I am not replacing my booklist with it.

number of books read in 2005: 86
number of books read in 2004: 103
number of books read in 2003: 75
number of books read in 2002: 91
number of books read in 2001: 78
average read per month: 7.2
average read per week: 1.7
number read in worst month: 3 (November, December)
number read in best month: 12 (March)
percentage by male authors: 74
percentage by female authors: 26
fiction as percentage of total: 55
non-fiction as percentage of total: 45
percentage of total liked: 84
percentage of total ambivalent: 14
percentage of total disliked: 2

8 Responses to “2005 reading list, a year end summary”

  1. BookFinder.com Journal Says:

    Personal reading index, 2005

    I’ve been keeping online reading list for several years now. Here’s my annual summary, my version of Jessamyn’s end of year reading index. number of books read in 2005: 103…

  2. Anna Says:

    I keep a separate reading list, too. I still treat LibraryThing like my personal OPAC with a shared catalog element. It’s more than just what I’ve read, and not everything I read will be in it.

  3. telewizory lcd Says:

    I also oneself something would want to find out on this theme. Very attentively I will read every post.

  4. Rutabaga Dreams » 2005 Reading Says:

    [...] I’m going to do a similiar tallying as I did last year, based on the stats at Librarian.Net’s blog (via Anirvan at Bookfinder) [...]

  5. Baby Got Books » Blog Archive » 47.5 Says:

    [...] If you’ll recall, when we started this blog, my initial hare-brained scheme was that we would all get in on the wacky internet meme going around at that time – namely, we would each read 50 books in 2005 and write about them. I quickly realized that if I was to have any company here at all, that whole 50 books thing was going to have to go out the window. And it did. So while not really taking it very seriously, I decided to keep track of my books just to see how I would measure up against that arbitrary yardstick. It turns out if I could have squeezed in two-and-a-half more books, I would have been there. If you are interested, here is a link to my 2005 list of books read (not including the half that I couldn’t finish). I can’t imagine reading any more than I did this year. I have no idea what I typically read in a given year, but this felt like substantially more than average. That’s a good thing.  I was checking out some other blogs that I know were working on the 50 books thing, and it is remarkable how many books were read. For example, check out Jessamyn’s stats at Librarian.net. Eighty-six books. And that’s down from last year for her. Jessa at Bookslut hasn’t posted her list yet, but she was way up there months ago when she last posted a number of books read. Neal Pollock, who has a kid, made me feel a little better. He looked like he was going to be close when he last posted a number, and he’s a professional writer. Maybe I’m not such a slacker. (Update: Neal Pollack only made it to 49. I feel better somehow.) [...]

  6. bosch Says:

    Online reading is bad. I prefer traditional books.

  7. dzieci Says:

    I prefer classic books reading too.

  8. katalog Says:

    here is a link to my 2005 list of books read (not including the half that I couldn’t finish). I can’t imagine reading any more than I did this year. I have no idea what I typically read in a given year, but this felt like substantially more than average. That’s a good thing. I was checking out some other blogs that I know were working on the 50 books thing, and it is remarkable how many books were read. For example, check out Jessamyn’s stats at Librarian.net. Eighty-six books. And that’s down from last year for her. Jessa at Bookslut hasn’t posted her list yet, but she was way up there months ago when she last posted a number of books read. Neal Pollock, who has a kid, made me feel a little better. He looked like he was going to be close when he last posted a number, and he’s a professional writer. Maybe I’m not such a slacker. (Update