who hasn’t wanted to live in a library?

Here is the Trailer for the imaginary feature film “The Library”

Aunt Feminina Boots goes to a Libertarian bookclub

I don’t know why this cracked me up so much. More amusing book club shenanigans over at Aunt Femininia’s website.

my library school sure has changed

Not only is it now an iSchool, and they’re offering an MLIS [among other degrees. I have an MLib] but they’re making information accessible and popular. Enjoy this Lady Gaga sendup. Watch for the Nancy Pearl cameo. Awesome job folks. I really should go back for my PhD. Some discussion and adoration on BoingBoing. [via]

and now for a change of pace, library 101

Please enjoy the Library 101 video and look for all your favorite librarians. Would love to see a credit list someplace.

using YouTube to promote fun library activities

So I gave a talk at NJLA, one of my favorite talks, called Advanced YouTubery. Brett Bonfield saw it and liked it and took some of the ideas to heart with this fun video promoting the Collingswood Library’s 5k race to raise money for a teen area in the library. Neat.

hi fi sci fi library & dorkmachine

Hi Fi Sci Fi Library! I love this little video that Michael Porter and David Lee King put together. You can see a small clip of me spazzing out partway through it. Nice work guys.

Me at work, seniors learning computers

Me at Work

Michael blogged about this last week I figured I’d add some more information. These are two students of mine that I visit irregularly at the Tunbridge Public Library. They’ve got pretty good computers and sharp minds but don’t know the first thing about how to navigate a file system or compose a message to save for later. We sit down and talk about how to do the things they want to do. The last time I was there, I made a little video and you can see it on YouTube.

I feel like I can just say “blah blah insert digital divide lecture here” but really, the library is doing an invaluable service here, and the job I have isn’t even paid for by the library. I’m an employee of a local technical high school that happens to take its outreach mandate very seriously and sends me to these places that happen to be libraries. If I had any tips for people wanting to do this same sort of thing, here they are.

  1. Encourage people to get laptops. I’m not a real Dell fanatic, personally, but because of them laptops aren’t as fiendishly expensive as they used to be. I really liked that my students were both using Macs because a) it’s the same kind of computer that I have and b) I find them much easier to use for someone who has never used a computer before. No need to start a flame war, but I’ve been doing this for several years and I’ve observed that my Mac students are happier with their computers. You can save people serious money if they have a laptop and they can use the library’s internet service occasionally and not have to pay to get broadband at home.
  2. Invest in wifi. If students have their own computers then you can teach them about the internet using their own computers. No matter how awesome our public access computers are, they’re not identical to the computers our patrons have at home, they’re just not. Students can learn things on the computers and then take them home and practice the exact same things.
  3. Solve problems. I used to teach a basic email class at the public library I worked at. It went great. However I would find that time and time again people would come to the class and sit through it because they had one loosely email-related question to ask. They didn’t even need an email class but there was no other way to get five minutes of dedicated staff time to ask a computer question. Consider being available in a way so that people who want a class get a class and people who just have questions can ask them. Also stress that they should come in with a problem to be solved, not just “I want to learn about computers” People who just want to learn about computers should probably go to a class.
  4. Larger groups help everyone learn. My two students got along great and it was excellent to have them learn from and teach each other as well as learn from me. Having multiple students (not a ton, maybe just two or three) encourages people to see tech support time as a limited resource, lets people see other people’s computers and their problems in a larger context, and makes computer time more sociable and less like school. Also I think people are less likely to let their technostress get the best of them if they are not in a private session with you.
  5. Keep it regular and keep it brief. Have set times when you offer tech support help. This keeps people queueing their questions to bring to you, can free up other less-savvy staff to refer people to you appropriately and the time limit means people will ask pressing questions first and prioritize their own concerns.
  6. Share with staff, create a FAQ. If I solve a problem that I see frequently (for example: how do I print just part of a web page) I’ll often share the solution with the staff so that they can know how to help people who come in with the same problem.
  7. Know when to say when. Unfortunately, the biggest problem in my area is that people need help at home, figuring out their printer, or their network or their desktop machine. I decided early on that going to people’s houses would not be part of my job. There has been a rare case where a patron got DSL and wasn’t sure how to do the self-install and I’ve traded help for a free dinner or something. Usually I’ll refer people to the professionals when they need help either buying equipment, installing something at home, or fixing a complicated problem with some legacy frankenstein PC. It’s too easy to own all of people’s future problems if you get too involved with some of these situations and I’ve sometimes had to tell people that I won’t be able to keep working with them unless they get a more stable computer or start practicing better computer hygeine.

Those are just some top-of-the-head ideas. My library background doesn’t make me special in this regard. Anyone who is okay dealing with people and knows technical stuff well could be part of an informal tech support program at your library.

A library defiled

I never really liked this song before, but now that I’ve seen the video for “Every time we touch” (which takes place in a library in a sort of “hot for teacher” manner” I’m a fan. [thanks john13!]

The OPAC sucks, the video

The Laughing Librarian has done it again, this time on YouTube. Please enjoy “The OPAC Sucks.”

libraries and librarians on video

A few different links.

  1. Do librarians really love Ask.com? Gary Price discusses the Ask.com television ad [mov file] where the founder of Ask.com says “If librarians love us, then I think the world should love us too.”
  2. WKYC’s news program “investigates” what they see as the growing scourge of porn in libraries. Here is the original newscast which includes [non-graphic] footage of them “catching” a man masturbating to porn in the library.
  3. Almost Live’s takeoff on COPS, featuring librarians
  4. bonus video: Conan the Librarian
  5. double plus bonus video: the filipino librarian’s I Am A Librarian video, a response to this