Library Journal’s Movers and Shakers

Library Journal has once again made the Movers and Shakers list look nice but not be super useful in the online world. I like seeing everyone’s photos. I’d prefer to get a copy/pasteable list of names. Here’s everyone [taken from the total list and grepped to only include this year's winners] and links to their LJ profile. If someone would like to add personal site URLs to this, please feel free to copy/paste/repurpose. Whoops, looks like Bobbi Newman had already done it, yay!

Maureen Ambrosino
Kenning Arlitsch
Barry Bailey
Brian Bannon
Rebecca M. Blakeley
Erik Boekesteijn
Chad Boeninger
Jill Bourne
J. Drusilla Carter
Natalie Caruso
Susan Conlon
Karen Coombs
Kim Duckett
Carlene Engstrom
Ann Dutton Ewbank
Lia Friedman
Dean Giustini
Toby Greenwalt
Jason Griffey
Carey Gross
Lisa Harris
William Harmer
Sarah Houghton-Jan
Ingrid Kalchthaler
Nancy J. Keane
Karen Kleckner Keefe
Casey Long
Laverne Mann
Daniel Marcou
Jamie Markus
Matt L. Moran
Joe Murphy
Rebecca Near
Kristi L. Palmer
Dave Pattern
Ken Pienkos
Michael Porter
Lauren Pressley
Lori Reed
Melissa L. Rethlefsen
Jenica P. Rogers-Urbanek
Lisa G. Rosenblum
Dorothea Salo
Allison Santos
Julie Scordato
Pam Sessoms
Koren Stembridge
Jaap Van De Geer
Geert Van Den Boogaard
Rachel Walden
Carlie Webber

Join the Shovers and Makers!

Shovers and Makers 2009: I’m a winner! (So are you.) shoversandmakers.net

I added myself. Go add yourself. Read more, if you want, but it’s pretty self evident. [thanks dan]

Library Journal’s Star Libraries – show me the data

Library Journal has been making an effort to open up more, make more types of content available. I’ve been enjoying following Josh Hadro on Twitter. This was particularly useful when their Star Libraries report came out. Vermont has five libraries on the list [yay!] and I was trying to figure out how this compared to other states, by population and/or by sheer numbers. Josh went back and forth with me a few times pointing to other ways the data was displayed to see if any were helpful. What I was looking for was a list — similar to the Movers and Shakers list we were always agitating for — but I got close. The data is available, among other ways

It’s hard to tell how all these pages are related to each other — this page is the best start page I found — and each page lets you comment which is also a little on the confusing side. I asked about where to find everything on one page and I guess you can’t do it. Library Journal staffers are hampered by a CMS that doesn’t really allow them to make decent links between things and whether it’s software or “wetware” the link they offered in a comment wasn’t even one I could click. So, yay hooray for the winning libraries and a “let’s do better next time” nudge for decent information design for this report next year.

dear annoyed…

Thanks Dan Chudnov, for saying what many of us have wanted to say.

linkdump for october ’08

Again, here are a set of things that maybe don’t need their own post but are worth letting people know about.

I’ll be doing another post on blogs added to my feed reader lately. I had organized and culled and plumped up my feed reading list a few months back [down time on an airplane] and was all pleased but then the hurricane that was my HD crash set me back to the beginning. I’ve been reading some neat stuff that I’ll be sharing with you.

know any Movers & Shakers?

Library Journal’s Movers & Shakers nominations are open from now until November 10th. Here’s the list of people who have already been honored. Does anyone remember if someone made a hyperlinked list of these names? I seem to recall one but am having trouble finding it.
update: Thanks Amy, it’s Connie Crosby who made the excellent hyperlinked Movers & Shakers list.

the thing about privacy

Now that I’ve gotten back from ALA and gotten some sleep, I’ve been ruminating over privacy topics some more. The panel went well. I also read Cory Doctorow’s book Little Brother on the way home — they were giving away copies at the panel — and enjoyed it quite a lot. It’s a YA just-barely-dystopian book about a terrorist-seeming event and the Bay Area lockdown that follows and how a group of tech savvy teens respond, and how others respond. It’s a good book.

During the panel, we were talking about things you’d want to keep private that you don’t necessarily need to keep secret. Sex and bathroom activities were two obvious examples. This then led to a discussion, more like hitting on a few points, about library records and how there is a difference between trashing them — so you can legitimately say “we don’t have any records to show you” — and obscuring them, say through encryption, so that the records are available to, say, patrons and yet not to librarians or, it follows, to law enforcement. I found this idea intriguing. Now that we’ve done a decent job making the point that patron library data is data that we protect, maybe we can make that protection more sophisticated so we don’t have to protect it by completely eradicating it. Maybe.

Anyhow, I got grabbed outside of the panel by Library Journal and I talked a little bit about this.

Also can I just say that Library Journal’s coverage of ALA was really engaging and worth reading this year? I haven’t been following ALA conferences in a while but I was surprised how much I enjoyed reading about this one in addition to attending it.

Congrats to Library Journal’s Movers and Shakers

Library Journal has put the list of Movers and Shakers online. Well, they have a list of their cutesy taglines, you have to click through to get the names. The page where they list all the Movers & Shakers by state has the names of every Mover and Shaker, though they’re not hyperlinked. Maybe we need to wikify this? I have included the list here. Can you guess any of the names? Life is too short, I copied the names over as well. update: Librarian by Day has gone a step further and linked to their blogs too, if available. Congrats to all of you.

Why isn’t your headline “why the hell are women still earning less than men?!?!”

I read Library Journal pretty regularly. I enjoy it, the writing is often great and John Berry and I see eye to eye on a lot of things. There have been a few lousy headlines about library topics that we’ve seen in the popular media, where the library was on what I would consdier the “right” side of an issue and the headline made them look like they were not. I read the whole article on salaries called What’s an MLIS Worth (for the record, I have an MLib.) and I have to say I could not get over the fact that women in librarianship, in all parts of librarianship earn less than men.

This fact is buried about four pages into the article in a section entitles “Gender Inequity Remains” and states “While women have seen positive improvements in salaries, finally topping $40,000, their salaries continue to lag approximately 6.5% behind salaries for men.” LJ then goes on to explain that they think this is because more men work in academic and vendor-type jobs where salaries are generaly higher. It also states that women have higher starting salaries generally and do better in special libraries where their salaries are 17.6% higher than men, but this section was one of the smaller ones in terms of total population; there were only 14 men’s salaries examined (and 86 women’s). Men in public libraries, on average, earn more than women, except in Canada. Men in academic libraries, on average, earn more than women. I’m sure there are many good reasons why this “effect” exists, but I’m a little curious whether there are really just a few totally plausible explanations for this, or if librarianship despite its intelligent, introspective, feminized nature is just as bad as everyplace else with its remaining gender inequity?

Jay Datema’s got a brand new bag

While I’ll miss Jay Datema’s editorial insights over at Library Journal, I’m thrilled as hell to see that he’s going to be working with the whizkids over at NYPL now.